Securing a divorce by filing contested proceedings with the New Jersey family courts can take months and cost thousands upon thousands of dollars. The more acrimonious things become between you and your ex, the longer it may take to resolve the outstanding issues from your marriage, such as the division of your assets and the creation of a parenting plan that helps you split up parental rights and responsibilities. 

If you hope to minimize the cost of your divorce or if you worry that a contentious divorce could have emotional repercussions for children in your family, divorce mediation could be a viable alternative to a litigated divorce. Many couples in New Jersey find that mediation is a great solution when they want to minimize the expense of their divorce despite not yet agreeing on terms.

The many benefits of mediation during divorce

If you successfully complete mediation with your ex, you will create an agreement at the end of mediation that will play a role in your uncontested divorce filing. Because successful divorce mediation allows you to file for divorce with the terms already set, you will spend less time in the courts and incur substantially fewer costs than you would during a litigated divorce. 

As if being faster and less expensive weren’t good enough reasons to consider mediation, there is also the control that you maintain over the outcome. When you litigate a divorce, the judge has the final say on all of the major issues. Mediation lets you and your ex maintain that control and set terms that really reflect what will work best for your family, not just what seems rational to someone unfamiliar with your family. 

Additionally, mediation is confidential, which means that your dirty laundry won’t wind up a part of the public record. That privacy can be beneficial for parents of minor children, as can the fact that mediation will protect the children from the stress involved in standard divorce court. The children generally won’t need to testify or make any kind of statement regarding their preferences if their parents agree to work together in mediation.