The family courts often spend a lot of time and effort on the creation of a parenting plan that reflects your family’s needs and the best interest of your kids. You and your ex may have spent many hours negotiating or testifying in court in order to secure the best possible outcome in custody proceedings.

However, as time goes on after your divorce, you may eventually realize that the custody arrangements aren’t ideal for your family. Situations can change in a way that makes you want a new custody arrangement. What are some of the more common reasons that parents go to court to ask for a custody modification after the courts finalize their divorce?

They fear for the safety of their children

Some people experience worsening mental health after a divorce that can make them unpredictable or violent. Others might get into a relationship with someone who has a history of domestic violence or get involved in drug abuse.

If you have any reason to suspect that your spouse might abuse or neglect your children or if they have already put your children in a dangerous situation, asking the courts for a custody modification may be in the best interests of your kids.

Their ex isn’t complying with the terms of the custody order

Some people just can’t put the kids first and will always have an issue with dealing with their former spouse. These people may engage in attempts at parental alienation. They might denigrate their ex to the children or intentionally interfere with parenting time.

If your ex isn’t letting you spend time with the kids or has tried to damage your relationship with them, asking for a modification can reinforce your right to spend time with the children and possibly motivate your ex to start complying with the court order.

The kids have different needs now

As kids get older, they may have more complex needs. They may need support getting to and from sports practices or require one-on-one parenting help to prep for the ACT.

If you will play a role in any of these new activities or needs for your child, asking for the court to modify custody to give you more time with them or to adjust the times you can spend with them can make it easier for you to include a positive change in the life of your kid and meet their ever-changing needs as teenagers.

There are other reasons that people seek modifications including needing to relocate or changes in their work schedule that will interfere with the existing parenting plan. Provided that there has been a substantial change in circumstances since your divorce, you may have grounds to seek a modification.